Game Reviews

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ZOMG, GUYS!! THE LEGEND OF ZELDA: TWILIGHT PRINCESS HD REVIE

PostPosted by EpicHawk » Mon May 16, 2016 1:15 pm

The Legend of Zelda is one of Nintendo's longest flagship series. Every instalment (save for Zelda II: The Adventures of Link) has gotten critical acclaim and with a new Zelda game coming in 2017, I think it's time to look back into the 2nd Nintendo GameCube instalment in the Zelda franchise: The Legend of Zelda Twilight Princess. A sequel to Ocarina of Time, it was considered at the time to be the greatest Zelda game ever made. Recently, it was remasterd for the Wii U. That's the version I own and the one I'll be reviewing.

Story:
The game takes place several years after Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask (if you wanna know the specifics, too bad. The Zelda timeline's already confusing as it is). This incarnation of Link is a Ordonian of Ordon Village, south on the mini map. A cattle herder who is in for some serious أنبوب. Anyway, one day, him and his best friends Colin and Ilia, are attack by Bulblins and subsiquentionally grabs Colin and Ilia and GTFO outta there and Link chases them. However, he's stopped in his tracks by a huge wall. Suddenly, he's grabbed by a really huge hand and is pulled into the Twilight Realm. Just a few seconds after entering the realm, he's suddenly transformed into a wolf and passes out.

He wakes up chained in a jail cell in a dungeon of sorts when he meets this really rude Imp called Midna. She breaks him out and she tells him that he's actually in Hyrule Castle. They explore the castle to find Princess Zelda and learn from her hat the Twili had invaded this place, led by their ruler Zant. She gave up Hyrule in order to protect her people, and that's why most of Hyrule is like this. She instructs him to free all of Hyrule from the Twilight by gathering the Light Spirit's Tears of Light. Being the Hero and all, he goes on his quest. Spoiler warning: he does.

The story is greatly written, being pretty dark for a Zelda game. My only complaint is that Zant at first looks really cool and menacing, but then he's shoved off for Ganondorf. Although, he's becomes really creepy when his necks snaps shortly before Ganondorf dies.


Gameplay:
The gameplay of Twilight Princess is similar to Ocarina of Time, but added with new stuff. Link feels as smooth as ever, and you can actually learn more skills throughout the game. Hyrule is big, but not too big. You get Epona earlier than Ocarina of Time, so that's a plus. Heart pieces are scattered across Hyrule, and getting five of them increases your health. You can also get a heart container from defeating a dugeon boss. Excluding some mainstays (bow, bombs, iron boots, clawshot) there are new items added to Link's arsenal, like the boomerang, which can be used to get items or to activate switches. The spinner, which let's you hook on to rails and access new areas, and the ball in chain, which can destroy structures a normal bomb couldn't do. There's also new armor, like the Zoron Armor, which lets you breathe underwater, and the Magic Armor: something I've never used because it drains your Rupees faster than you can yell "EEEYYYAAAAAAAHHH!!!"
Twilight Princess has two types of gameplay: Human and Wolf. Wolf gameplay controls the same for the most part. You can dash, bite, use your sense to locate hidden أنبوب, and you can also attack multiple enemies at once. Both styles of gameplay need to be mastered in order to progress through the game.

The dungeons are not what I would call "difficult", but you will need to think a little in some parts. Every dugeon comes with its own map, so you won't get lost, and a compass which somehow helps you find chests in the dugeon even though a compass supposed to show you which way is North, South, East, and West. There's also a ton of mini games you can do to get a larger quiver, a bigger wallet, or new potions that can refill your health and add temporary status buffs. I never actually fully 100% completed the game, but when I researched into it, I was shocked to see just how much stuff is in the game.


Presentation:
I don't need a spoiler tag for this one. It looks gorgeous. For a GameCube title, it's great looking. Models look top notch, textures look smooth, and the music is good, but nothing beats Skyward Sword's soundtrack. The cutscene's themselves are cool and the motion capture they used is smoothly implemented.

Overall Score: 9/10

If you haven't played this game yet, the do so right now. Buy the Wii U version, because it's probably the only version that's available nowadays.
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Re: Game Reviews

PostPosted by TheMetaphoricalPen » Tue May 17, 2016 7:44 am

1/10 would not read(not again cuz i didn't read it once)
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Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War

PostPosted by Hydro Mech » Tue May 17, 2016 10:12 am

From the moment the intro cinematic began, I was hooked into Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War . It sets the violent and bloody mood and begins a cavalcade of strategy and violence that kept me hooked to the computer for hours and would keep me hooked for more hours were it not for the fact that I have billions of other games to play. It isn't that Dawn of War does anything extraordinarily new or brilliant in terms of gameplay mechanics, but the battles are just so ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) entertaining and the pace of the game fast enough that it's hard not to have a good time.

The Warhammer 40,000 universe is an incredibly rich one. As they say, in the distant future, there is only war. And the war in the distant future is the unforgiving, brutal, no-nonsense kind of war with uncompromising soldiers leading the charge. All of the races in the galaxy want to slaughter each other... badly. Through thousands of years humans have become one with their violence, adopting a kill or be killed mentality when dealing with these alien races. But along the way, they've also adopted a kind of religion and spirituality that is neither fluffy nor particularly comforting. Their undying Emperor and his theocracy is the centerpiece of a human life washed in blood and order. To protect this mighty Imperium millions of men and women carry weapons as part of the Imperial Guard. On top of that, clans of battle hardened and enhanced soldiers known as Space Marines float through the galaxy bringing war against the enemies of humanity. Each chapter of the Space Marines gives complete allegiance to the Emperor.

The campaign itself centers around one of these Space Marines chapters called the Blood Ravens, designed and included specifically for this game. There are many other races in and about human space, three of which have been included for the purposes of the game. The Orks, Eldar, and forces of Chaos all play a part in the drama that arises during the single player campaign of Dawn of War and stick around for the bloodletting of skirmish and multiplayer. Each of them have their own personality and style of play to keep things fresh. The Orks are built for war, but lack in firm technology using a junkyard wars approach to battle while the Eldar are an ancient and magical race that consider themselves superior to all others. The Chaos mix in all three races with the taint of evil washing over all they touch.

And in this, Relic has done a stunning job. The dark and gritty Warhammer 40,000 universe has finally been given its due. As I said earlier, the scene is set right off from the moment the awesome intro cinematic provided by Blur Studios begins. I can see why they won't let players skip through it the first time the game loads up. I'm not even sure how many times I've watched it at this point, but it certainly makes you long for some sort of animated movie or series in that style.

The rest of the game plays off with just as much presentation and flair as we're used to from Relic in games like Homeworld and Impossible Creatures . Relic has shown they know how to make and present complete entertainment experiences and Dawn of War only emphasizes their grasp of what it takes to make a game more than just a game. Every battle players find themselves embroiled in can turn into a hardcore blood splattering fest of violence so brutal and crazy as to become almost gleeful in its gore spattered presentation.

There are a ton of great animations for the different attacks each of the units can make against their foes including some awesome "finishing moves" that leave victims bloody and broken. Each type of attack is signaled by size of the units (smaller units will attack up at bigger units instead of hacking at their ankles) so there is some semblance of proportion in the ruined cities and amongst the vehicles and soldiers. Some attacks are even reserved for certain types of units such as when one of the Space Marine heroes meets with the chaos daemon Bloodthirster.

The only problem I had with any of the presentation values of the game were the in-game cutscenes that drive the story. Animations in these cases were clunky and disjointed. I like the current idea of using the game engine to create cutscenes, but I'm looking forward to the time when the animations in these are fresh and more natural. Voice-overs were also pretty varied in quality. Some were okay, but others were pretty sad. I just can't get over an Inquisitor that's supposed to be hardcore, but sounds like George Takei. George Takei is not hardcore.

On the other hand, the thick cockney accents of the Orks sing out their playfully violent nature. They cuss, moan and lust for blood and they glory of battle and I loved every minute of it. In fact, the unit sounds and acknowledgements during the game are pretty good overall aside from the Space Marine and Chaos hero characters.

Relic has done a fine job making Dawn of War just as brutal and painful as players of Warhammer 40,000 would expect.

Now, those that are expecting the table top game come to life are going to have to put away those rulers and dice. Relic never had any intention of creating that kind of game and basically decided that they would mainly use the universe and table top game as a starting point with basic relationships between units remaining intact. For instance, one Space Marine would kick the crap out of one Ork. From that entry point, Relic worked to create an interesting gameplay experience that would make more sense in the Warhammer 40,000 fiction.

Thus they decided to take some basic ideas found in many RTSs and combine them into something not quite new, but unique in its delivery. The game comes out more tactical in nature than economic, but there is still a good amount of base building in order to get new units and upgrades as well as defend. But instead of mining for gold or some rare mineral, players will have to fight over strategic points. When captured, they give points with which to enlist new groups or pay for upgrades. Basically, the mothership is saying, "hey you're doing a good job with what you have, here's some more." Because these are stationary points that have to be taken in order to gain "money" for new units, players have to be on the move and thinking about advancing in order to do well. It's been done in games like Ground Control II but that's fine with me. I really like this style of play, especially when combined with the intense savagery and thunder of constant conflict.

The only real problem can be getting to battles quickly because of some pathfinding issues. While units can find their way across the map pretty well, watching them try to fumble around in the midst of other units during a battle can be frustrating. The bounding boxes on each of the bigger units, especially the walkers such as the Space Marine Dreadnought, seem too big, meaning they can't fit through areas that they should be able to. Infantry units also get confused about which way to walk when in the middle of many vehicles.

The other main thing I should emphasize is that the gameplay works better in multiplayer than it does in the single player campaign. That's not to say that the campaign is bad... it's just not quite as fun with the way the gameplay is set up. You'll do the same things that you would in multiplayer and skirmish, but the AI will be much less aggressive as a whole when taking and holding capture points. I've found that if left alone, the enemy AI will attempt to begin new bases in odd areas, but that happened pretty seldom. The result is a fun campaign that isn't a huge challenge if you're patient about your progress since objectives don't push you to capture new points quickly.

I'm convinced that the real fun is in the skirmish and multiplayer. Depending on how you set the AI, skirmish can be quite the challenge. In fact, it can be downright impossible. Because of all of the little clicks that need to happen in squads to keep them manned and armed (you can add more members to a squad up to a certain number and arm them with bigger weapons), it can be a little overwhelming unless you're a "clicks per minute" type of guy. The computer obviously has a big advantage in managing all of the units at the same time and keeping them powered all the way up. Memorizing and using hotkeys is definitely going to make things easier and will probably be mandatory if you want to play against any good players online or against AI higher than easy.

Several different victory conditions can be used in each game to mix up how players will interact with the map and each other. One of my favorites is simply capture and hold, which means players have to capture a certain amount of critical locations on the map and hold them for six minutes in order to win. The catch is that the point that has to be defended can't be fortified with weapon emplacements like the other points of contention can. Several other modes are included that focus on the same kind of fast paced gameplay that forces players into the field rather than allowing them to sit and defend an area while other opponents slug it out.

Adding to the replay value are different races that have varied playing styles while remaining well-balanced. The ideas behind reinforcing and arming squads remain the same through many of the unit types, but the way you use them is completely different. Orks, for example, are much less powerful on a whole than the other races, but have a much, much higher unit cap using the Zerg swarm mentality. The Eldar, on the other hand, are a much more difficult race to master. Each of their squads can actually be upgraded into a different type of squad that has a very singular use while Space Marines have units and vehicles that have multiple uses for almost every situation. It'll be interesting to see how players end up adapting each of the races to their style of play.

THE VERDICT:
Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War is the first game in a long, long time that has even come close to doing the franchise justice. The fact that it hits the nail on the head isn't necessarily surprising; it's just been such a long wait that it's almost emotional. Everything from the drab and blasted landscapes to the perfectly realized models and varied animations make a perfect host for this ultra-violent future to inhabit.

Nothing about the gameplay will really surprise anyone (though the addition of reinforceable squads is pretty neat) but it doesn't particularly matter. The factions are balanced very well, the battles are entertaining enough to make excitable gamers pee their pants, and the pace keeps players attention stuck to the screen at all times. Relic kicked dunkeh creating a great piece of entertainment.
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Re: Game Reviews

PostPosted by TheMetaphoricalPen » Wed May 18, 2016 7:50 am

Well then.
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Re: HOLY ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°), IT'S BATMAN: ARKHAM KNIGHT (PC)

PostPosted by EpicHawk » Sun Jun 26, 2016 2:23 pm

Batman is one of the many mascots of DC, a superhero who doesn't use superpowers to save his city. Orphaned at a young age, parents lost to crime in Gotham City, and with a billion dollar industry in his hands, he uses a multitude of gadgets and the skills he learned from the League of Shadows to fight against the criminal underground and has developed quite the Rouge's Gallery. His success in movies and comics (All-Star Batman and Robin not withstanding) has influenced how superhero films are marketed to this day. However, before the Arkham games, Batman's video game track record hadn't seen the same success. It was more of a hit and miss. That is until Rocksteady Studios created Batman: Arkham Asylum and broke the cycle of mixed Batman games. It was great, the voice acting done by the cast (Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill from TAS most notable), the gameplay was a mix of stealth and combat, and the story was tightly focused and delivered, at the time, the greatest Batman game of all time. But, they weren't done yet. The sequel, Arkham City, beat out its predecessor in so many ways you'd have to play it yourself to believe it. And then Arkham Origins came out, which was...okay.

Now, Arkham Knight. released for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The finale of the Arkahm series, and let me just say that THE PC VERSION AT LAUNCH WAS GOD AWFUL!!!!!!!!!!!

Low Res. Graphics, tons of technical glitches and worst of all: the port was done by a company with NO EXPERIENCE in PC PORTS!!!! It got so bad that Warner Bros. actually had to remove the game from Steam and actually finish it. But, that was then, now? It's better. It's been patched, taken care of, and finished. Now? It's pretty stable. On par with the console versions of stability.

So, without further ado, let's dive in into the Arkham series's swan song: Batman Arkham Knight.

The story of Arkham Knight takes place on Halloween, one year after the Joker's death back in Arkham City. The crime rate has dramatically declined, and Batman is struggling to come to terms with the absence of his long time nemesis. After a sequence where a local cop eating at a diner sees some jaw dropping, eye covering, pee-in-your-pants hallucinations, Scarecrow makes his appearance, saying that his new strain of toxin will douse Gotham in fear. The entirety (save for some criminals and Gotham's finest) evacuates the city, leaving it to the villains, crooks, and the GCPD. However, when there's a crime and the officer is too busy raiding the donut shop, there is a Bat. It's up to Batman and the GCPD to ensure that the threat is removed and the Scarecrow gets put behind bars.After rescuing Ivy from a group of armed military looking (⌐■_■), Batman heads over to Ace Chemicals where a militia group has taken a number of staff members hostage. It is here where those who were under a rock since this game was announced that the Arkham Knight is not a reference to Batman, but a new character who's true identity is EXACTLY who you think he is the moment he أنبوب talk's Batman. Anyway, Batman learns from the staff that Scarecrow plans to use Ace Chemicals to make a toxin bomb. Batman locates Scarecrow, but Scarecrow reveals that he has kidnapped Oracle, and escapes, leaving Batman in the room. Batman manages to reduce the blast radius but not while having to breathe in the fear toxin and seeing the Joker pointing a gun at him.A flashback will tell you that Joker's plan to ship his Titan infected blood to Gotham's hospitals back in Arkham City kinda worked. Some hospitals didn't get the message, and as a result, five people were infected with Joker's blood. Instead of killing them, however, it's slowly altering their physical and mental state, turning them into Jokers. That's not all: the cure Batman injected into himself to rid of Joker's blood when he had it has worn off and his slowly, slowly, slowly turning him into another Joker. So it's a battle from within and Batman's ultimate brawl between Scarecrow, Jason Todd (Arkham Knight), and his inner insanity.

The story is something that has a of high points and a lot of low points. Batman's inner battle is executed well (especially in the final parts of the game), and the 1st ending was well written and well thought out. BUUUUUUUT, the low points of the story just suck. Arkham Knight at one point has Batman on the floor with a gun pointed right at his head, but Scarecrow tells him not to because he wants Batman to be scared first. Not only is that completly terrible, but it reduces the Arkham Knight to a guy that constantly bad-talks the Dark Knight and doesn't once capitalize on anything. Plus, the villians are kind of underwhelming. Okay, so Scarecrow united all of Batman's gallery of bad guys (save for Ivy) to take out the Bat on Halloween. Yet, almost all of them are reduced to sidequests and pitiful easy bosses (oh god, Two-Face). Why couldn't they just remove sidequests all together and give Batman a actual challenge by facing Scarecrow in addition to all the bad guys? Alas, we shant.


Gameplay wise, it's mostly the same, but with some new additions here and there. The gameplay from previous Arkham Game has not changed at all. The combat still involves chaining as much punches and kicks as you can without getting hit. Most of Batman's upgrades and gadgetsfrom Arkham City are still here. Some newounces include a retooled cryptographic sequencer, allowing Batman to hack into his environment during stealth sections, and a voice modulator, which can fool enemies into going somewhere they shouldn't. Early in the game, you'll get a new batsuit, which is not only faster and can cover large distances while using the grapnel boost, it also lets you do Fear Takedowns. Fear Takedowns allow you to chain up to 3 enemies (5 when fully upgraded) in a single chain and can only be recharged by doing a silent takedown. It's a great edition and seeing Batman perform it kind of reminds me of Quicksilver in both Days of Future Past and Apocalypse. Maybe it's because they both have time slow downed, I guess.

However, the biggest edition to Batman's arsenal is his Batmobile! That's right, you get access to the Batmobile and drive it all around town. Sounds cool, right? Well...it also has a Battle Mode, and you'll soon find out that Battle Mode is 60% of what you'll be doing in this game. No, I'm serious. The Batmobile gets as much screen time as the Dark Knight himself. Upgrading it to it's maximum capacity first should be the first thing you should do. Gotham City is huge. 5 times the size of Arkham City's map. It's pretty huge, and you'll probably need the Batmobile to traverse the city in a quick fashion. I say "probably" because when I played it, I sometimes barely used the Batmobile to traverse through Gotham and instead used the combination of the Grapnel Boost and Glide, unless I used it for etting Riddler Trophies-OH YEAH, RIDDLER! He's in the game, and has managed to trump Arkham City and Arkham Origins in the amount of Trophies, Riddles, and Riddler Challenges. There's even some moments where (SPOILERS) you race against the clock in underground race tracks built Nigma to get Catwoman's shock collar off her (BTW, Riddler's sidequest involves Batman helping Catwoman get a shock collar off after being held by the Riddler). The races are awesome to go through, and hearing Riddler bad-talk you when you've almost one a race is sweet stuff.

There are also new enemy types like enemies who can heal others and grant them an electric shield (there's a legit science to that), enemies who require a bit more punches to take out, variations of the big enemies with knives and electric fists,
Image

and during stealth sections against the Militia, the soldier's will adapt to your tactics. So yeah, the difficulty can get pretty high at some points, but you should be able to adapt and conquer any challenge ahead.

The presentation is good, and (obviously being a next generation game for the PS4 and *XBOX ONE), the graphics are the best in the series. The voice acting is good stuff, and the stability of the game (as of now) is smooth. There are some dips in the frame rate, but that happens so infrequently, you'll probably forget about it. Models are up to snuff, the controls are smooth, and the alternate costumes are great looking, and since the cut scenes are rendered in real time, that means the alternate costumes get shown in the cutscenes. That means the Adam West Batman costume for every occasion.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Batman: Arkham Knight is a great game. It's gameplay is the best in the series, the graphics are the best in the series, and voice acted pretty well in my opinion. Some parts that drag it down, however, are the story, sidequests, and the music (YES, the MUSIC). The story is a mixed bag, kinda like Dawn of Justice, with some good moments that are awesome, and some bad moments that are awful. The sidequests don't really do much except make me wish that every single villian actually had a part to play in taking down the Bat, and some weren't really all that interesting. The music, from what I've seen in interviews, is basically redone themes of Arkham City. At times, however, it seems that they just used the original Arkham City tracks, and that's kinda lazy. At least Arkham Origins had a original soundtrack. Overall, a great game. Some hiccups in there, but a great game none the less.
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Re: Game Reviews

PostPosted by krazy » Tue Jun 28, 2016 2:35 pm

It would be great if you could stop putting your subjects in all caps for no apparent reason. Thanks.
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EpicHawk's Review of Uncharted 4: A Thief's End

PostPosted by EpicHawk » Thu Jul 14, 2016 6:13 pm

I FINALLY GOT A PLAYSTATION 4 NOW!!!!!




And what better game to review for this occasion than one of my favorite game series of all time: UNCHARTED.



Uncharted is one of the PlayStation flagship gaming franchises that was created by Naughty Dog, the Sony exclusive company that is responsible for Jax and Daxter, Crash Bandicoot and The Last of Us. Basically, it's an Indiana Jones movie in video game form, with the main character, Nathan Drake, traversing through jungles and terrain, climbing tall structures, solving unique puzzles, and shooting rival armies to be the first to discover some of history's greatest mysteries in history...

It's pretty awesome, which each installment improving upon everything its predecessor had done. The one I'm reviewing is the supposed finale to the series, A Thief's End which takes place 3-4 years after Uncharted 3. Let's just dive in already.




Story:
So after traversing through the Amazon in search of the fabled El Dolrado, climbing up a derailed train hanging from a cliff with a gunshot wound to the abdomen in search of Shambala, and wandering through the Rub' al Khali desert with nothing but a KAL-7 to find Iram of the Pillars (What's that? There's a another Uncharted game that was on the PS-Vita? What's that? That game's never mentioned ever in this game? That's convenient. I don't have to add that to the beginning of this paragraph.), Nathan Drake has decided to call it quits and live a normal life with his wife (for real this time), Elena Fisher. Things are going well. He's got a 9-5 job diving for wrecks, stamping papers at Jameson Marine, but a part of him misses the adventure, the rush of adrenaline. One fateful night, he gets a visit from his presumed dead twin brother, Sam, and is suddenly thrown back into the life of an adventurer in search of a treasure that's been haunting them since they were kids.

The story of Uncharted 4 is a solid and worthy conclusion to the series. It's got action packed, funny, and heart-felt moments and there is rime and reason for the things each character does and says. For example, Rafe, the main antagonist, is after the treasure because he doesn't want to be the guy who got his money from his parents, and Nadine, the second antagonist that runs the army-for-hire, Shoreline, wants the treasure to keep her army in check. The focus is on character relationships (most notably, Nate and Elena's relationship) and they're done beautifully. It's well-paced, with transitions between action and more calm scenes being smoother than ever. However, to nit-pick a bit, I was kinda expecting for Chloe or Charlie to show up. I mean, since this is the conclusion, you'd think everyone Nate's met should be there. Never the less, this is a very well-told story, and is probably the best one of them all. Although, you may be duped into thinking this game will be a darker take. I mean, look at the cover:
Image
It looks like some dark أنبوب's gonna go down, but it still is a fun, mature adventure. Um...what? Then again, you'd have to have never played an Uncharted game to think that.


Presentation:
Dude, it's a (⌐■_■) Naughty Dog game. It's (⌐■_■) gorgeous. The details to the environment are stunning, facial animation is jaw-dropping to look at, and controls are extra smooth. The voice acting is tremendous. Nolan North once again is great as Nate, Troy Baker cranks out another stunning performance as Sam, and everyone overall is just so into their character it's nuts. Even the soundtrack is awesome stuff. Just listen to it.


Gameplay:
The Uncharted series is well known for harboring three types of gameplay: traversal, puzzle-solving, and combat. A Thief's End still retains those but adds a new type of gameplay: vehicular levels. At certain points in the game, you will be able to drive around in a really large area and best part of all, you can get out of the vehicle at anytime. There's also a huge emphasis on stealth, and you can totally approach every situation the way you want to and the game doesn't punish you for getting spotted. Every encounter can be approached with stealth and I love that. In terms of platforming, there's a new rope that Nate can use to climb up or down the rope swing across gaps, and pull objects towards you. Later on, you can get this spike that can be used to cross from ledge to ledge that are out of reach. You can even incorporate the rope into combat, swinging on the rope shooting the enemy, or swing to an enemy and Air Strike them.


Final Level:
Yeah, I'm doing this Completionist style, so SPOILERS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

After going on quite the adventure, Nate and Sam manage to reach Libertalia, a ancient pirate colony discovered by Henry Avery and some other great pirates. They get seperated during an encounter with Rafe and Nadine, but eventually regroup with Elena and Sully, Nathan's old friend and mentor. Nate, Elena, and Sully think that the treasure isn't even worth it anymore, but Sam wants to see it through, causing Nate to go after them. After climbing some precarious ledges, he manages to reach Avery's ship in a turtle shaped rock. He enters and finds the missing treasure, but is confronted by Rafe and Nadine. However, Nadine turns on both, disarming them and leaving them to die in the burning ship. Rafe decides that only one of them can leave, and challenges Nate to a sword fight (Avery and Thomas Tew's, one of the pirates that also founded Libertalia, bodies were found with swords sticking out of each body). The final fight isn't really all that challenging, but you're gonna have to read Rafe's movements to know what button to press to dodge. After that, you've beaten Rafe, Nate rescues Sam and the two hightail out of there. Many years later, Nate and Elena go out and do...things National Geography people does. They even have a daughter, Cassie. Awwwww.


Collectibles:
Just like previous installments, there's collectibles in the form of treasure that you have to go out of your way to collect. You earn points for getting these, which you can use in the Bonus menu to change skins, render modes like Cel Shading and Rainbow Fun Land, and add some gameplay modifiers like Zero Gravity and Slow Motion. It's really cool how they just added these in there.


Result:
It's awesome. Buy a PS4, buy Uncharted 4: A Thief's End.
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Re: EpicHawk's Review of inFAMOUS: Second Son

PostPosted by EpicHawk » Wed Sep 21, 2016 10:44 am

So, since I've gotten a PS4 for my birthday, I've been trying to expand my collection of games a bit. I now have a total of 5 games. Off to a great start, yes. I figured that I'd review all of them.

So, inFAMOUS is a video game series crated by Sucker Punch, who also made the Sly Cooper games, and in it you control a Conduit, a person who has a special gene that allows them to absorb and manipulate things like water, electricity, or ice. It's notable for it's traversal skills, it's insane use of power, and it's unique Karma system that let's you either use your powers for good or evil. I played the second one, inFAMOUS 2, and I enjoyed it. It was fun.

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Story:
Second Son takes place in 2016, six years after the New Marais incident (play inFAMOUS 2 to understand what that means). During that time, Conduits have re-emerged and have been feared by the populous. In response, the government has decided to create a group called the Department of Unified Protection to fight fire with fire. Since then, tons of Conduits have been captured and life still goes on.

Meanwhile, in Salmon Bay, a small area near Seattle, is the Akomish, a Native American tribe that's celebrating a very special day: Akomish Day! I have no idea what that is. All Akomish are celebrating, drinking some drinks, and what have you. However, there is one tribe member who wasn't feeling all that Akomish tonight and decided to vandalize a billboard using stencil graffiti. Meet Delsin Rowe, everybody!
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After using Eco-friendly spray cans to make a stencil art of the new sheriff's face, he marvels at his work. And then gets caught later by his cop-brother and whose face Delsin desecrated, Reggie. As they're arguing, a random military truck comes by and crashes right in front of them just outside the Longhouse and two figures are seen running away. Reggie tries to go after the two, and Delsin just helps one who's stuck under the wreckage. And then a series of events happen, which involved getting sucker punched in the face, held up like a human shield in front of his brother, and seeing the guy absorb smoke from the car, Delsin suddenly wakes up to find that he can dash through certain objects by momentarily turning into smoke. He uses his power to find the guy who made him this way in hopes of fixing this. However, upon grabbing his arms again, he suddenly taps into the guy's memory and finds out that he, along with some other Conduits, were experimented on in a maximum prison specifically designed for Conduits called Curdan Cay, and that he was the one who created the crash in hopes of running away. After that, the convict runs away and Delsin gives chase, only to see him killed by concrete. Brooke Augustine, head of the D.U.P and Conduit herself (fire with fire), confronts Delsin and asks if anything kinky happened in there. Delsin tries to not get locked up and experimented on by saying nothing happened, to which Augustine responds by sending concrete right up Main Street. JK, just the thighs. This is where your first Karmatic choice happens, Good Guy or Bad Guy? Either way, Augustine sends more concrete up the thighs, knocking Delsin out.

Delsin wakes up a week later to find that things have happened. A) The two people who escaped the crash were Conduits themselves and have fled to Seattle, B) The D.U.P has put Seattle under martial law to recapture said Conduits, and C) Augustine decided to interrogate everyone in Delsin's tribe (save for Reggie) and has left them to the fate of concrete poisoning. Blaming himself, Delsin decides to take it upon himself to confront Augustine and leech off her power to save his tribe.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Second Son's premise is interesting. I like how they do the whole "Conduits and humans are on opposite spectrums" theme and I would've liked to explore more into this. Unfortunetley, they kinda rush through a lot of plot points. They never leave room for more character development, it just goes by really fast and that angers me. They also could've explained things better, like how is Delsin able to gain powers from Conduits and why Delsin will either be the good guy or the bad guy. They could've also spend more time with the supporting cast, because I already like them. You got Hank, the guy Delsin got his smoke power from, Fetch, the neon Conduit whose life was ruined by drugs, and Eugene, who's a nerd. And can summon video angels and demons. And THEN there's Reggie. They should've updated the dialogue depending on what Karma alignment you're in. For example (SPOILER), when Delsin is being the hero, saving lives and destroying drugs, Reggie should pick up on that and congratulate him. If Delsin's being the villian, stopping Lifeline activists from defiling Conduits, Reggie should be like "Yo, stop this now, bro!" Also (MORE SPOILERS), his dialogue never changes when he DIES!! He still is like "I'm proud of you, man." It makes sense for Good, but Evil? Your brother just went after harmless bullies and flipped the bird at freedom of speech, and you're PROUD OF HIM!? It's incoherent, but you'll be having so much fun with the gameplay, you might not notice it.


Gameplay:
Which brings us to the game itself, and it's really fun. You're a walking super hero/villian! Delsin can climb up walls and jump across rooftops like there the rocks he used to climb back in Salmon Bay, and with his powers, he can get more airtime. Delsin can have up to four powers: Smoke, Neon, Video, and Concrete.

Smoke's your starter power and is pretty effective for scattering D.U.P troops. With it, you can fire a regular Smoke Shot, charge your shot and release a cinder blast, throw a sulfur bomb which can stun enemies, or you can straight up fire a cinder missile at them. You can also do the Smoke Dash to get through fences, charge up close to enemies and bat them with your chain of ash and sulfur, or dash into cents and launching from them like a jack in the box. You can also preform a Karmatic Bomb, which applies to Neon and Video, but not concrete. Depending on your alignment, you will have to either perform enough good acts or keep up the killings to activate the Karmatic Bomb. Smoke's Bomb is the Orbital Drop, in which you go flying into the air and come back down, swiping everyone and everything off their feet.

Neon is the second power you get and is a good way to earn some good and bad karma. You can run at light speed, shoot neon beams at the legs to subdue them or the head to obliterate them, throw a stasis bubble to make it easier to subdue/obliterate, fire a photon beam for max damage, use your chain like a neon sword to strike fast, or use your Karmatic Bomb, Radiant Sweep. Pick up enemies off the ground and fire a barrage of neon beams to either subdue or destroy.

Video is the third power you get and is totally awesome. You can go invisible and summon demons and angels to aid you in battle. Depending on your Karma, you can either use a angelic sword or a demonic claw as your melee weapon. You can also gain more air time, as you get angel wings granting you a short dash. You also get an upgraded hover, and a Video Turrent. You also shoot Video swords that home in on enemies and do massive damage. Your Karmatic Bomb is Hellfire Swarm. It's preety much a Kamikazi of Angels/Demons and it looks AWESOME!!!!!

The final power is Concrete, something you get at the endgame. It doesn't have a Karmatic Bomb, but it's still pretty useful. The only way to refill is to drain it off enemies (concrete Armor). You can rush through the streets at blazing speed, shoot concrete at enemies, fire a spread shot of concrete, fly even higher, and you can take more damage.

Overall, the powers are awesome to see in action and they don't overpower the other. You'll be switching up powers to better fit how you're gonna approach the situation. The Karma System returns, and that will effect your upgrade system. Good Karma is all about making it easier to survive in battle and just earn more good Karma. Evil, though, is all about the kill count. Trying to get as many people dead as possible. They have enough to where they play differently and don't overlap each other.


Presentation:
This game was one of the first PS4 games to be on the system, and it sure looks stunning. The facial capturing of the actors during cutscene's are marvelous to look at, and the unique lighting of Seattle is breathtaking. It also helps that you can change the time of day after you beat the game so that you can truly feel grateful at just how much went into this game. Its truly well done and one part I'm glad the developers focuses on.


Side Missions:
What's an open-world game without side missions, right? The D.U.P's control has spread far and wide, and after doing the mission where to take out the contraptions they've hooked up the the Space Needle, you can start driving the D.U.P out of Seattle. The way this is done is through creating inspiring stencil art, destroying cameras taking out D.U.P Agents, collecting audio logs from a sympathetic D.U.P soldier, and collecting the blast shards in that district. Once you've done all that, you can start a district showdown, in which you vandalize a billboard of the D.U.P and completely drive them out. It can get repetitive, but only if you're paying no attention. You're not going to, trust me. There's also mini-karma options on the map. You can stop a drug deal and rescue suspected conduits to earn good karma or break up some Lifeline Activists, kill some street performers and musicians, and end the lives of the Akurans to earn evil karma.

There's also the-


Whoa. Anyway, what I was trying to say earlier was-


Would you stop that!? Who keeps doing that? I'm trying to talk about the P-


The Pa-


The Paper-


WOULD YOU SHUT UP AND LET ME TALK ABOUT THE PAPER TRAIL???????!!!!!!!


Heh, it's gone. Anyway, let's talk about the Paper Trail.


Aw crap.


Paper Trail:
The Paper Trail was initially weekly DLC, but thanks to a recent patch you can now play through all of it. It starts up right after completing the Karmatic Mission with Fetch. The Paper Trail has Delsin follow the trail of a mysterious Conduit who can control paper. As you progress through the trail, some truths about the D.U.P and how far their control is will be revealed. The truth's already out there, you just have to find it. In order to do this, you go back and forth between your computer and PS4 console in order to solve clues you find at the crime scene. It's a little frustrating, but it's effective at exploring into the whole freedom vs security theme that this game has. If you didn't have enough of Second Son from the main campaign, this might solve that problem. Might.


Verdict:
inFAMOUS Second Son makes some bold strides for the franchise, ditching the graphic novel style and going for a more stencil art style, which for the most part works. The characters are great, but underdeveloped. The story has its themes, but doesn't explore more into that than I wished it did. The gameplay is fun, and the level of enjoyment you can get out of Smoke, Neon, Video, and Concrete are a continuos reason as to why the inFAMOUS games are so appealing. The Karmatic System could've had a bigger impact, but it's probably part of the tradition, anyway. Overall, a good game. Just start with the first inFAMOUS. This isn't a great starting point.
Overall an 8/10.
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EpicHawk
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